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Chris Dove. Tekstiler Kvartal, Nørrebro, Kobnhavn

The Tekstiler Kvartal of Nørrebro is located in the centre of a large urban block in Copenhagen. The blocks of Nørrebro are of an unusually large proportion, and used to contain industrial buildings at their centres which would provide work for the district. These centres were completely lost in a series of over zealous slum clearance in the 1960s. The thesis looks to reintroduce the idea of industry in the centre of a block, to form a new urban strategy for Nørrebro. The Tekstiler Kvartal creates a situation in the centre of a block, consisting of two large industrial components that occupy the territory in the centre. These large glass and concrete components contain the spaces for recycling and making of the textiles into raw material in which young designers can use. An archive of textiles is established. The introduction of glass and concrete, into the centre of the block, acts as a new typology of architecture in the centre of the block. These industrial spaces are contrasted by a layer of smaller scale, studio spaces, which connect the industrial centre with the retail and residential edge of the block. The studio components of the Kvartal are of a solid […]
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Ian +. Liget Budapest Museum

We propose a linear and horizontal museum, conceived from inside out. Organizing the exhibition space on one floor. We propose a project that despite having two separate museums, imagine one as an extension of the other. The buildings construct the boundary between the park and the city, creating a continuous exposition space, a grid ordering the continuity between interior and exterior spaces. The grid defines all identical rooms, where the human dimension relates to the scale of the landscape; rooms delimit an intimate space, where one enters into symbiosis with the artworks. The grid also draws the open space and public space organization. The museum rooms grid becomes an apparently isotropic multidirectional space, able to allow a great flexibility. The grid system can be divided and opened all the time, according to the exhibition requirements.
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Lujac Desautel. Visualising Hockney through Mies

In the following image series, I was interested in using David Hockney and Mies Van Der Rohe as the main subjects.I combined the two using Hockney’s painting through Mies’s techniques of overlapping, framing, and composition as if Hockney seamlessly reproduces a Mies-like attitude to space while retaining the atmospheric mood of the California lifestyle suggesting that these images or any image can be appropriated and misappropriated for our owns.David Hockney moved to California in the late 1960’s where he painted a series of pictures that arguably defined the California Aesthetic. One of his most iconic paintings, A Bigger Splash, is flat, colorful, and abstractMies Van Der Rohe created a set of collages for the Barcelona Pavilion. The collage comprised of pencil on paper defining the edge of the roof, floor and mullions. Images of paintings, marble, wood are collaged on top of one another that create depth and space.A notable distinction between the two artists is that Hockney uses photographs for the subject of his paintings. Mies Van Der Rohe represents architecture that will be built through an improvised composition. Secondly, the California architectural style Hockney was painting at the time has similar qualities to the International style of Mies.
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Perry Kulper. Cloud Veil

created by Perry Kulper, Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Michigan.We are privileged to be guided through the world of the maker – by way of photos taken by Perry himself, we get an exclusive look at the way such images are created, by hand.”Interested in discovering rather than knowing, or proving, ‘Cloud Veil’ is an in-progress visualization, the first part of an imagined three-part drawing, a triptych. It explores the potential of varied cloud species, of spatial blooming and of occlusion as a form of representational and spatial communication.”
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Kostas Manolidis. Buenos Aires Contemporary Art Museum

The currently dominant model of an art museum calls for spaces sealed from the exterior, with absolutely controlled light and temperature conditions. This study for a new museum originates from a desire to challenge this model and imagine a more exposed and raw framework for the interaction of people with art objects. In the process of this fabrication another consideration also emerged. The very name of Buenos Aires (good winds) generated stimulating implications. Wind is an agent metaphorically associated with the invigorating impact of human intellect and therefore its evocation could be appropriate for an architecture that accommodates works of art. To embody this metaphor in the new edifice, a split along the full length of the building is separating the ground and the upper floors. It allows the potential flow of the air breezes through the building and introduces the latent presence of wind. A large elevated platform for open-air exhibitions and other public activities was the main element that enabled the rest of the scheme to be built upon. Such a platform should maintain some kind of linkage with the ground itself in order to be perceived as an integral part of the urban terrain. For establishing this […]
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Nemestudio. Museum of lost volumes

Once upon a time in the Zero-carbon Hedonistic Era, the entire world was finally sustainable. Clean-energy technologies were abundant and ubiquitous. Large quantity of energy-efficient light bulbs, wind turbines, electric car batteries and solar panels would come with a price, however. Since all of these clean-energy technologies relied on Rare Earths, a group of seventeen chemical elements and their abundant extraction from the earth’s surface, significant worldwide increase in their demand led to the scarcity of these minerals. Nearly all of the Rare Earths were discovered in the 19th century but their use mostly proliferated in the Zero-carbon Hedonistic Era because of their association with green technologies. Not alarmed by the possible tragic outcomes of the further mining of these minerals, the world celebrated their delirious consumption with more car batteries and solar panels until very little of these minerals were available. Soon after the depletion of this precious resource was officially announced, in an attempt to prevent major geopolitical conflicts, United Council of Rare Earths was established to promote international co-operation regarding this matter. In its inaugural meeting, the Council members drafted the text of the Declaration by the United Council of Rare Earths, which was signed by all […]
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